Health and Healing Fact Sheets

Strawberries


Common Oregon Varieties

Totem
Redcrest
Hood
Pugent Reliance
  • Fresh season is typically June 5-24
  • Predominant cultivar of Oregon
  • From a cross of Puget Beauty and Northwest
  • High Soluble solids
  • Excellent titratable acidity for fruity taste
  • Flesh remains firm with texture in products
  • Ice cream berry
  • Large fruit, fully red internally and externally
  • Late ripening - fresh season is typically June 5 - July 7
  • High soluble solids and low acidity, low drip loss
  • Flesh remains firm
  • Large conic fruit, with ultra red internal and external color
  • Highest quality fruit for processing, but can be difficult to grow
  • Early ripening - fresh season is typically June 1-20
  • From a cross of ORUS 2315 & Puget Beauty
  • Excellent fruit quality for processing but difficult to grow
  • Medium to large fruit with excellent external and internal color.
  • High soluble solids and high acidity, low drip loss.
  • Excellent in ice cream
  • Fresh season is typically June 3-22
  • From a cross of BC 77-2-72 & WSU 1945
  • High yield, large fruit
  • High soluble solids and good acidity
  • Ice cream berry
  • Deep red internal and external color
Source: Oregon Strawberry Commission


Common California Varieties
California has several strawberry varieties in commercial production, each with its own characteristics, advantages, and harvest time. Below are the varieties most commonly grown on California 's more than 30,000 lush and fertile acres.
     
Albion  

This new day-neutral variety has a seasonal fruit production yield similar to that of Diamante. However, Albion generally has a slightly lower spring peak and is less prone to a summer gap in production. Albion has a more consistently conical shape and similar fruit size and especially early in the season, has substantially better weather tolerance than Diamante. Its fruit color is darker, both intenally and externally, and its flavor is consistently sweeter.

Aromas  

Released in 1997, this day-neutral plant produces a large, firm fruit with great flavor, a good red color, and a bright sheen. Fruit is produced slightly later than other day-neutral varieties and production continues into late fall. Aromas are currently grown on nearly 2 percent of the statewide acreage and are mainly produced in the Watsonville/Salinas district.

Camarosa  

This short-day variety produces large, bright, firm and flavorful fruit with a good sheen. Because this fruit ships and stores so well, it can be picked with full red color and still retain shelf life. Due to early production potential, Camarosa is the primary variety for southern districts, though it's also grown in the north. Released in 1993, Camarosa accounts for nearly one-third of the state's acreage.

Camino Real  

This new short-day variety was commercially planted for the first time in 2002. Early tests show it performs well in the Santa Maria district. This variety has firm, dark red fruit with a good shelf life and very good flavor. Camino Real has a relatively high resistance to common plant diseases.

Diamante  

Released to the industry in 1997, this day-neutral variety accounts for more than 23 percent of the state's acreage. A large, flavorful, firm fruit with a bright red sheen and a long shelf life, Diamante may be picked with full red color. Though grown primarily in the Watsonville, Salinas and Santa Maria districts, this fruit is now being tested by growers in other areas.

Ventana  

This new short-day variety was available for the first time in 2002, on limited acreage. Ventana produces fruit earlier in the season than Camarosa, has excellent fruit quality, and though specifically adapted to early planting in southern California, has also performed well in Santa Maria. Ventana has bright red fruit, slightly lighter in color than Camarosa, a good flavor, shape and fruit size, with similar firmness and shelf-life to the Camarosa. Ventana accounts for nearly 9 percent of the state's acreage.

Source: California Strawberry Commission


Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC), Anthocyanin, and Ellagic Acid Values
ORAC value is 1,540 per 100 g; Anthocyanin is 450-1,000 µg/100g; Ellagic Acid is 570 µg/g

Source: Oregon Strawberry Commission


Mirco-Nutrient Chart

Substance
Measurement
Amount
Nutraceutical Significance
Alanine
µg/g
310
Amino acid, component of protein
Alpha -Linolenic-Acid
µg/g
780
Omega 3 fatty acid found in the strawberry seeds, similar to fat in flaxseed
Alpha-carotene
µg/g
.05
Carotenoid, similar to beta-carotene, can be converted to vitamin A, antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic
Alpha-tocopherol
µg ATE/g
1.4
Vitamin E, antioxidant
Anthocyanin
µg/100g
450-1,000
Antioxidant, protects membranes
Arginine
µg/g
260
Amino acid, may affect immune function
Ascorbic Acid
µg/g
567
Vitamin C, antioxidant
Aspartic Acid
µg/g
1380
Amino acid, component of protein
Boron
µg/g
1-160
Possible role in maintaining strong bones, may be needed for proper membrane function
Caffeic Acid
µg/g
2
Phenolic acid, antioxidant activity
Calcium
µg/g
140
Helps build strong bones and teeth, involved in nerve transmission and muscle contraction
Chromium
µg/g
0.005-0.18
Works with insulin to regulate blood sugar levels
Coumaric acid
µg/g
14-27
Phenolic acid, antioxidant activity
Cystine
µg/g
50
Amino acid, component of protein
Ellagic Acid
µg/g
570
Anticancer activity
Ferulic acid
µg/g
2
Phenolic acid, antioxidant activity
Fiber
µg /g
23.000
Helps reduce cholesterol
Flavonols
µg/g
35-79
Antioxidant benefits, includes quercetin and kaempferol
Folic acid
µg/g
0.18
Needed for proper red blood cell formation, cell division and protein synthesis
Gallic Acid
µg/g
80-121
Phenolic, with antioxidant activity
Glutamic Acid
µg/g
900
Amino acid, component of protein
Glycine
µg/g
240
Amino acid, component of protein
Histidine
µg/g
120
Essential amino acid
Iodine
µg/g
0.157-0.23
Needed for proper functioning of the thyroid gland
Iron
µg/g
3.8
Constituent of hemoglobin, helps transport oxygen in body and prevents anemia
Isoleucine
µg/g
140
Essential amino acid
Leucine
µg/g
310
Essential amino acid
Lutein
µg/g
0.3-3
Carotenoid, important for vision
Lysine
µg/g
250
Essential amino acid
Magnesium
µg/g
100
Needed in enzyme systems involved in
energy production
Manganese
µg/g
2.9
Co-factor in enzyme systems, involved in bone formation, energy production and protein metabolism
Methionine
µg/g
10
Essential amino acid
Pantothenic Acid
µg/g
3.4
Important in nerve and brain metabolism
Phosphorus
µg/g
190
Maintains strong bones and teeth
Proline
µg/g
190
Amino acid, component of protein
Riboflavin
µg/g
0.7
Releases energy from food, necessary for healthy skin and eyes
Salicylic Acid
µg/g
13.6
May help decrease clotting risk factor
for cardiovascular disease
Selenium
µg/g
.007
Antioxidant, protects vitamin E
Serine
µg/g
230
Amino acid, component of protein
Silicon
µg/g
10-270
May be important for proper bone structure and growth
Thiamin
µg/g
0.2
Needed for releasing energy from food
and normal nervous system
Threonine
µg/g
190
Essential amino acid
Tryptophan
µg/g
70
Essential amino acid
Valine
µg/g
180
Essential amino acid
Vitamin B-6
µg/g
0.6
Important for protein and fat metabolism
Zinc
µg/g
0.33
Important in protein synthesis, wound healing and growth
Source: Oregon Strawberry Commission


Health Benefits
Strawberries contain a broad range of beneficial nutrients, including vitamin C,
folate and fiber. Researchers around the world are also recognizing that the phytonutrients in strawberries - including ellagitannins and quercetin - may have considerable preventative effects on cardiovascular disease, cancer and cognitive decline.

Science tells us that antioxidants are key to warding off chronic diseases like heart disease and cancer and to promoting optimum health. Researchers have tested foods to understand their antioxidant capacity. One test called Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity or ORAC for short showed that strawberries are packed with antioxidants, most notably anthocyanins, the pigment that makes strawberries red. The only problem, researchers warned, is that we don't know if the antioxidants get into the body efficiently.

Well, preliminary results from a study on strawberries conducted by Dr. Gene Spiller of the Sphera Foundation show that 30 minutes and 60 minutes after eating strawberries antioxidant levels in the body peak markedly. This reveals that the antioxidants in strawberries are efficiently absorbed. Once antioxidants are absorbed, they are able to fight free radicals—rogue compounds that wreak havoc on the body.

  • Strawberries are packed with antioxidants.
  • Anthocyanins are the antioxidants that make strawberries red.
  • Antioxidants in strawberries are efficiently absorbed into the body.

Source: California Strawberry Commission


Nutritional Profile of Strawberries
Source: USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference

Nutrients 1 cup fresh 1 cup canned, heavy syrup 1 cup unthawed, unsweetened frozen
Weight 144 grams 254 grams 255 grams
Calories 46 234 199
Protein 0.96 grams 1.42 grams 1.33 grams
Lipid (fat) 0.43 grams 0.66 grams 0.36 grams
Carbohydrate, by difference 11.06 grams 59.77 grams 53.55 grams
Fiber, total dietary 2.9 grams 4.3 grams 4.8 grams
Sugars, total 6.71 grams 55.45 grams 48.37 grams
Sucrose 0.17 grams    
Glucose (dextrose) 2.94 grams    
Fructose 3.60 grams    
Starch 0.06 grams    
Calcium 23 mg 33 mg 28 mg
Iron 0.60 mg 1.24 mg 1.20 mg
Magnesium 19 mg 20 mg 15 mg
Phosphorus 35 mg 30 mg 31 mg
Potassium 220 mg 218 mg 250 mg
Sodium 1 mg 10 mg 3 mg
Zinc 0.20 mg 0.23 mg 0.13 mg
Copper 0.069 mg 0.160 mg 0.048 mg
Manganese 0.556 mg 0.508 mg 0.635 mg
Selenium 0.6 mcg 0.8 mcg 1.8 mcg
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid 84.7 mg 80.5 mg 100.7 mg
Thiamin 0.035 mg 0.053 mg 0.038 mg
Riboflavin 0.032 mg 0.086 mg 0.196 mg
Niacin 0.556 mg 0.145 mg 0.747 mg
Pantothenic acid 0.180 mg 0.455 mg 0.275 mg
Vitamin B-6 0.068 mg 0.124 mg 0.071 mg